Category Archives: Hydrogen Fuel

Apple Facilities Running on Renewable Energy

Apple’s Data Centers Now Running on 100% Renewable Energy, Corporate Facilities at 75%

Source: http://www.macrumors.com/2013/03/21/apples-data-centers-now-running-on-100-renewable-energy-corporate-facilities-at-75/

Water-to-Hydrogen Systems a Myth

The environmental movement’s success is due to many factors. One of the most important is its insistence on telling the truth. We insist on calling corporations and politicians to account for concealing inconvenient truths.

Big corporations are hardly the only offenders. Many small companies and individuals jump at the chance to tell a lie to make a buck.

Take for instance the “water systems” reputed to boost gas mileage.

They don’t work, as Popular Mechanics has demonstrated here: The Truth About Water-Powered Cars.

Money and time should not be spent promoting technologies that don’t work.

Would you spend a couple hundred bucks on one now? Then let me hear from you — but only if you have an image of your receipt.

No More Power Bills … Ever?

Just found this on the always-great Scientific American site and had to share:


EAST AMWELL, N.J.—Mike Strizki has not paid an electric, oil or gas bill—nor has he spent a nickel to fill up his Mercury Sable—in nearly two years. Instead, the 51-year-old civil engineer makes all the fuel he needs using a system he built in the capacious garage of his home, which employs photovoltaic (PV) panels to turn sunlight into electricity that is harnessed in turn to extract hydrogen from tap water.

Although the device cost $500,000 to construct, and it is unlikely it will ever pay off financially (even with today’s skyrocketing oil and gas prices), the civil engineer says it is priceless in terms of what it does buy: freedom from ever paying another heating or electric bill, not to mention keeping a lid on pollution, because water is its only by-product.

Slide Show: Photos show what makes this house work

“The ability to make your own fuel is priceless,” says the man known as “Mr. Gadget” to his friends. He boasts a collection of hydrogen-powered and electric vehicles, including a hydrogen-run lawn mower and car (the Sable, which he redesigned and named the “Genesis”) as well as an electric racing boat, and even an electric motorcycle. “All the technology is off-the-shelf. All I’m doing is putting them together.”

“I’m a self-sufficiency guy,” he adds. Strizki, a civil engineer, has been interested in alternative energy sources since 1997 when he began working on vehicles fueled by alternative means during his tenure with the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Strizki’s two-story colonial on an 11-acre (4.5 hectare) plot 12 miles (19 kilometers) north of Trenton is the nation’s first private hydrogen-powered house, which he now shares with his wife, two dogs and a cat. (His two daughters and son, all in their 20s, have left the nest.) It has been running entirely on electricity generated from the sun and stored hydrogen since October 2006, when Strizki—in a project that his wife Ann fully supports—built an off-grid energy system with $100,000 of his own cash and $400,000 in grants from the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, along with technology from companies such as Sharp, Swagelok and Proton Energy Systems.

The Strizki’s personalized home-energy system consists of 56 solar panels on his garage roof, and housed inside is a small electrolyzer (a device, about the size of a washing machine, that uses electricity to break down water into its component hydrogen and oxygen). There are 100 batteries for nighttime power needs along the garage’s inside wall; just outside are ten propane tanks (leftovers from the 1970s that are capable of storing 19,000 cubic feet, or 538 cubic meters, of hydrogen) as well as a Plug Power fuel cell stack (an electrochemical device that mixes hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity and water) and a hydrogen refueling kit for the car.

On a typical summer day, the solar panels drink in and convert sunlight to about 90 kilowatt-hours of electricity, according to Strizki. He consumes about 10 kilowatt-hours daily to run the family’s appliances, including a 50-inch plasma television, along with his three computers and stereo equipment, among other modern conveniences.

The remaining 80 kilowatt-hours recharge the batteries—which provide electricity for the house at night—and power the electrolyzer, which splits the molecules of purified tap water into hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is vented and the hydrogen goes into the tanks where it is stored for use in the cold, dark winter months. From November to March or so Strizki runs the stored hydrogen through the fuel cell stacks outside his garage or in his car to power his entire house—and the only waste product is water, which can be pumped right back into the system.

“I can make fuel out of sunlight and water—and I don’t even use the water,” he notes. “If it’s raining, it’s fuel. If it’s sunny, it’s fuel. It’s all fuel.”

The modular home—built in 1991—looks like a typical suburban house; its top-of-the-line insulation and energy-efficient windows look no different, and the facade hides the hydrogen-powered clothes dryer and geothermal system for heating and cooling, which pumps Freon gas underground to harvest heat in winter and cool in summer.

“Geothermal is another piece of free energy,” Strizki says, noting that he dug eight feet (2.4 meters) down into the granite under his home to take advantage of the constant 56-degree Fahrenheit (13-degree Celsius) temperature underground. In summer he can use the lower temperatures underground to cool his entire house, and in winter he can capture those warmer temperatures, supplementing them with a heat pump powered by electricity from hydrogen. “Nothing goes to waste.”

This year, Strizki is hardly running his $78,000 Hogen electrolyzer (manufactured by Proton Energy Systems in Connecticut, a company that makes hydrogen-generation equipment) because last year’s mild winter left him with full tanks. When he does turn it on, the excess hydrogen vents from a small pipe on the roof with the sound of an impolite burp.

That vented hydrogen speeds at 45 miles (72 kilometers) per hour through the atmosphere on its way off the planet—one of only two gases, the other being helium, that escapes into space entirely because it is lighter than air. In fact, Strizki’s quarter-inch thick propane tanks weigh less when filled with hydrogen than when depleted.

Of course, hydrogen is a highly flammable gas, but its quick escape eases Strizki’s fears that it might ignite or explode. It “disperses faster than any other gas,” he notes. “Hydrogen won’t sit around waiting for a flame.”

The final piece of Strizki’s energy solution is dubbed “Genesis,” his $3-million aluminum Mercury Sable, one of 10 that carmaker Ford produced in the 1990s to test how well the lighter metal would fare in crash tests. Ford gave Strizki the special model to drive in the Tour de Sol solar car race in New Jersey in 2000. Strizki installed a 104-horsepower electric engine (compared with a Toyota Prius’s 44-horsepower motor) that can reach speeds of 140 miles (225 kilometers) per hour. Pop the hood and next to the electric engine sit two fuel cell stacks that convert hydrogen and oxygen into water and electricity, propelling the electric engine forward smoothly and quickly.

The car never competed because it was not ready in time, but the unique vehicle does hold the world record for farthest travel on a single charge: 401.5 miles (646.2 kilometers), a distance which Strizki drove in December 2001. Today, Genesis shares the road with a variety of less costly fuel cell cars: Honda’s new hydrogen-powered FCX Clarity, which hit the market this week leasing for $600 a month, as well as the hydrogen-powered Chevrolet Equinox test-vehicle fleet from General Motors—part of a pilot program that aims to determine how hydrogen cars might function in everyday life. Both the Japanese and U.S. automakers are betting that these nonpolluting cars will one day replace the internal combustion engine.

GM is committed to building a “mass volume” of its hydrogen fuel cell powered Equinoxes in coming years, according to Larry Burns, GM’s vice president of research and development, but only if a way to refuel them exists. As it stands, the entire nation has just 122 hydrogen stations—compared with 170,000 gasoline and diesel stations.

This is part of the reason that not everyone is a fan of hydrogen. Former U.S. Department of Energy official Joseph Romm, a physicist, notes that it’s a waste of time and electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen instead of just using the electricity directly in an all-electric, plug-in hybrid car. The debate boils down to whether batteries or hydrogen are a better way to store and deliver electrical energy.

But Strizki argues that hydrogen offers benefits that batteries do not. For example, GE Global Research found that hydrogen might prove a better way to store electricity generated by renewable resources in remote areas—such as wind farms in North Dakota or solar arrays in New Mexico—than building expensive and costly electric transmission lines. Instead, the hydrogen generated in such locations could be pumped nationwide through existing natural gas pipelines, providing fuel for a fleet of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Regardless of whether those future vehicles are powered by hydrogen or rechargeable batteries, both would move using an electric motor that does not require polluting (and newly expensive) fossil fuels. And they would come with another important extra benefit: the batteries or hydrogen fuel cells that run the car could also serve as a backup energy source for the home. “I can plug this car into my home and run it,” Strizki notes.

Strizki is now working to bring the price down enough to make homes powered by the sun and hydrogen affordable for average consumers. He says that he can build a solar-hydrogen system for as little as $90,000, thanks to dipping costs for solar panels and lessons learned in building his home. Even at that price, however, the off-grid system would be expensive compared with annual electric bills in New Jersey that average $1,500, although that number has been increasing every year, including a jump of as much as 17 percent this year.

But add gasoline costs to that—which average more than $3,000 annually, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration—and the price becomes more reasonable, particularly because the EIA figures were calculated back when gasoline was $2 per gallon rather than the present $4. “It didn’t make sense when gas was $1 but now at $4? A lot of things that didn’t make sense, now make a lot of sense,” Strizki says.

He is already overseeing construction of the second such home-energy system—estimated to cost $150,000—for a wealthy client in the Caribbean.

The backyard tinkerer is also working with several potential clients to construct off-grid homes in New Jersey, New York State and even Colorado, and has quit his most recent job as an installer of solar energy systems to concentrate full-time on the company he co-founded to promote the homes: Renewable Energy International. The key to bringing the price down will be newer, better generations of the component technology, particularly the electrolyzer. Fuel cell manufacturers such as ReliOn in Spokane, Wash., are already taking a page from the computer industry—employing removable individual fuel cells, known as “blades,” similar to the computer blades in data centers, that can be changed individually if problems occur.

Ultimately, this suburban home may become the first of a coming hydrogen-electric economy—one that eliminates or sharply reduces the greenhouse gas emissions causing climate change—or merely another technological dead end, like Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome or dymaxion car.

“The only way to get a zero-carbon footprint is to grab the big power plant in the sky,” Strizki says. “Maybe [the solar-hydrogen house] is too expensive, maybe not as efficient as they like, but no one is saying it doesn’t work.”

Smart Energy Technology: www.OrganicMechanic.com

Hydrogen Car and Multi Fuel DVD & Book


In a world gone wrong with pollution and over-consumption, many inventions are geared towards keeping or saving a green earth. Worth noticing among the many exceptional inventions made with this scope in mind is the Hydrogen Car. With the fuel prices rising every day and the increasing need to shift toward alternate and renewable fuel resources, a vehicle running on hydrogen might just be what the doctor ordered.

What Does This Product Do?

The main idea is to convert a standard gas-guzzler into a Hydrogen Car. No dealership actually sells such an innovative vehicle therefore that is not what can be bought from this website (http://www.knowledgepublications.com/google_hydrogen_2.htm). What you do get is even better: the know-how of converting a regular engine, such as the one in that beloved and trusty old sedan resting in your driveway, into a hydrogen-based, highly fuel efficient engine. The transformation would reduce fuel consumption down to a third. Once modified, this hydrogen-based engine would be able to:

* Run on any type of hydrogen, no matter its level of purity.

* Instantly improve fuel efficiency through a process called “hydrogen boosting”, where a small amount of pressurized hydrogen is injected into any type of fuel (natural gas, methane, bio fuel, producer gas and such) to bring down the cost at about 75 cents per gallon.

* Use any type of fuel, however degraded such as straight gasoline, low octane or even lawnmower fuel with the help of “hydrogen boosting”. Worries for gas could then be over for ever.

* Mix gasoline and diesel together with “hydrogen boosting” to get a readymade “engine cocktail”.

* Use low or non-sulfur diesel after adding hydrogen to it.

* Run on alcohol, turpine oil, propane, vegetable oil, rejected oil from commercial fryers (which simply requires filtering) and so on.

In other words, almost anything could power up any engine at one third of regular gas costs. Isn’t this simply wonderful?

How is this Accomplished?

A dynamic duo formed of Roy McAlister and Steven Harris is bringing this concept to the public after having personally used it for over 40 years. Harris discovered and developed the basics during his time as an engineer at the Chrysler Motors Company (now known as the reputable Daimler-Chrysler), and then was joined by McAlister who specializes in vehicular energy and electrochemistry. Together they produced a DVD meant to teach car owners, frame by frame, how to transform a regular engine into a hydrogen-based motor which can do all the above-mentioned wonders.

Not only is a massive reduction in gasoline costs accomplished when using such an engine, but it also helps in bringing down harmful emissions currently and increasingly plaguing our entire planet. An enterprise that actually allows the accomplishment of two goals: (1) Save a car owner from wasting a bundle of money (2) Save the environment which is being wasted in large part by car owners.

Though this instructional DVD is exceptionally clear and easy to follow, the authors recommend to first try and convert a small engine such as that of a lawnmower or a moped. This initial step provides the ability to learn hands-on the process of setting up the conversion materials. Once comfortable with the kinks and twists, these newly found skills can be used to transform a genuine car engine into a hydrogen-based one for a car to be driven with enjoyment and absolutely no worries for fuel consumption, since your car can now literally run on anything. Except maybe for water…

Smart Energy Technology: www.OrganicMechanic.com

Your New Car on 6 Fuels – and only 20% Emissions

A Gmail conversation about choosing a new vehicle
that is cost effective and eco-friendly:


Jennifer
: I’m looking for a new car, any suggestions? I’m thinking Honda Hybrid Civic, or a Prius with 50 MPG.


8 minutes
4:31 PM me: ;)
4:33 PM honestly?
i think you need a diesel. they are awesome engines.
Jennifer: yeah
I haven’t even started looking at those because of gas milage
er cost of gas rather
I’d have to do a MPG V Cost comparison
me: you mean VEG mileage, jen?
;)
4:34 PM Jennifer: oh, I do!
:-)
me: What is your budget?
Jennifer: about around 18,000 or less
me: oh wow
4:35 PM you could have the most pimped Greencar possible
Jennifer: I’ve got money saved, plus I’m trading in the bug, hoping to get 1,000 out of it at least, so I’ll only be paying on 11,000
haha
pimpin
4:36 PM me: i mean WOW it would be amazing
Jennifer: I’d have to look into the practicalities of doing that
4:38 PM me: what if it ran on 6 fuels, and cut emissions to only 20% of normal.
you start with a base vehicle
4:39 PM a kickin’ vw for instance
Jennifer: 6 fuels?
me: maybe a mercedes …there are many choices for high quality diesels for under 10,000 if it’s just a few years old.
4:41 PM Yes, 6. It is a diesel, and as it is a post mid-nineties model then the tubes are almost certainly biodiesel compatible. that is 2.
a vegetable oil kit is installed. this will be the primary operating fuel. 3.

5 minutes
4:46 PM me: now it gets interesting. to really cut emissions, and boost horsepower significantly, a hydrogen generator is installed. This is far simpler than it sounds. and safer. do a search on amazon and find the kid’s toy car that operates on the same premise – electrolysis. add electricity to water and hydrogen is free to be burned. this is fed into the air intake of the engine.
4:47 PM hydrogen is multiple times stronger than any typical liquid fuel
4:48 PM so only very small amounts of water – like a few ounces – are required to sustain the reaction for hundreds of miles.
4:49 PM Jennifer: really…?
hmmmm
me: this awesome injection boost makes the engine consume 40-60% LESS liquid fuel!! this is all fact.

4:56 PM me: and there are still 2 more energy sources at work. the electrolysis requires energy to sustain the reaction. conventional wisdom is, attach it to the battery, which is charged by the alternator during operation. this works, but it is drawing energy from the engine to do it, lowering efficiency and reducing the benefit of adding hydrogen injection. so instead of upping battery storage and the alternator, you employ 2 passive forces to supply power: a solar panel on the roof, and recurisve breaking – which is used on many hybrids today. a lot of kinetic energy is created when braking happens, and it is very simple to redirect that electrically.

5 minutes
5:01 PM me: out the tail pipe: veg oil has half the emissions as diesel, and the hydrogen replaces half of the normal veg usage. The ONLY emission from the hydrogen combustion is PURE water. (which actually might help nature?) plus with the increased efficiency, the fuels will more properly and totally combust, creating another 5-15% drop in emissions. you would have the healthiest car on the road.

8 minutes
5:09 PM me: so i have one question for you
Jennifer:
Yes
5:10 PM Am i feeling luckY?
haha!
me: do you want to CHANGE THE WORLD?
haha
Jennifer: I do change the world!
5:11 PM I’d need help, and a plan, and a car, for all of this

5 minutes
5:18 PM me: you could visit events and show it off. might want to have a webpage and blog about it. you could connect with people in an awesome way. newspaper, radio, tv, is easy to set up and fun.
5:19 PM me: your car could be the concept car that blows people’s minds.

14 minutes
4:53 PM Jennifer: I have some concerns initially. Who can install it? Also this needs to be something I can maintain on my own, or at least be able to pay someone to do it. You know?

5:39 PM me: installation: there are a few biofuel conversion places, or you could maybe find a University to help? This part could be a challenge, but I bet there is someone who can do it. maintenance on your side: you will put diesel or biodiesel from the pump into the primary tank. the car will drive regularly like this. then when you have the time and interest to collect vegetable oil, a very convenient filtration system would be available. or you could essentially buy it in bulk from Costco or whatever at that point because it will be burned half as much (hydrogen injection provides the other half of the energy). that may be intimidating, but it’s actually fun and easy to learn. i could help a lot with it, and there could be a storage tank that you could refuel from. if you did go recycled oil, that would be in my opinion the most sustainable choice, as you are not using virgin crops but a waste product. this ALSO means that your fuel costs would be essentially NOTHING. during startup and shutdown the vehicle would use a bit of diesel, or biodiesel (which can be homemade but is a chemistry filled pain in the rear). when the system was warm enough it would switch to veg. that system would require a filter change every 500-2000 miles. this will be easy to access and totally doable, or you could ask any mechanic to service it for you – it’s really not that hard, and maybe you know someone who could help you with it once a month or so.


6 minutes
6:00 PM Jennifer: I think I need to review what you just told me and think about it, I’m going to look over it tonight once I get home. Will you be online later so we can further discuss?
6:04 PM me: yes i’ll be online later. i should be getting back to work here. glad you’re considering it, this really interests me!
6:05 PM Jennifer: great! I’m interested in knowing what I can do to make this happen, if it makes sense for me. We’ll chat later. Thanks for everything and I’ll talk with you soon!
Smart Energy Technology: www.OrganicMechanic.com