Category Archives: Emissions

Top 5 Green Cars of Fall 2013

Top5GreenCarsFall2013

Alternatively fueled cars aren’t sexy simply for how they help the environment—they save you the money you normally would spend on gas, too. From hybrids to true electric, luxury to everyday driving, these five cars mark an exciting time in U.S. car culture. Plug in to these alt-fuel cars and enjoy the ride, as well as the savings in your pocket.

Cadillac ELR

The Cadillac ELR is what the Chevy Volt was intended to be, according to Car and Driver. It’s fuel-efficient, fun to drive and a feast for the eyes. The drive train is the same as the Volt, the engine is bigger and the exterior has the lines of the Converj concept car displayed at the 2009 auto show in Detroit. Planned for a late 2013 release, the price is rumored to be close to $60,000, which will keep curiosity seekers away but draw those with a green conscience and a taste for luxury.

A large console dominates the front interior, to cover the 288-cell battery that powers this machine. This is the same battery as in the Volt, with two drive motors and a 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine to keep it charged. Per GM, the performance is expected to be in the range of zero-60 mph in eight seconds. One may expect 35 miles on a full battery charge.

BMW i3

Car Connection reports that the i3 is a new-from-the-ground-up design. It’s not an electric retrofit of another model.

The body is carbon-fiber reinforced plastic, making it lighter and stronger than other cars. The entire side of the car can be opened for access, because there is no need for a door pillar. This shell sits on an aluminum frame which holds the battery and drive train.

A two-cylinder gasoline engine is available as an option to generate enough electricity to keep the car moving between charges. This is a standard feature in the Chevy Volt, but is optional in the BMW.

BMW states the expected mileage on a charge is 80-100 miles. The estimated MSRP is $41,000. People who love their BMWs may watch how well this new design takes off. The initial buyers will likely already have a BMW in their garage.

Ford Focus Electric

Less about style and more about function, the electric Focus has an estimated mileage of 75 on a full charge. Otherwise, the performance should be similar to the gas version of the Focus. At an MSRP of $39,200, this Focus is packed with many standard features, such as HD radio, navigation and Ford’s MyTouch infotainment system.

This is still a Ford Focus with an electric engine. Those who prefer the subcompact world but want to step into the green, all-electric world, should look into this vehicle.

Chevy Volt

The Volt was a pioneer of electric cars, and it has set the tone for many designs after it. The $39,000 MSRP may scare off potential buyers, but by now, the Volt will be showing up in used car listings. The Kelley Blue Book has used cars and prices, so future Volt owners may find a good deal on a 1-year-old electric car.

The two electric motors and unique drive train are still innovative. The standard gas engine charges the battery and gives an average 35 mpg. For many, this is still the car to buy as an entry into all-electric driving.

Nissan Leaf

Available in late 2013 will be the second generation of the Leaf. There are a few changes, mainly to the electrical equipment. With the improvements comes a reduction in price. The MSRP will be $29,650.

An improved charging system, navigation, voice SMS read-out and backup camera system highlight the equipment changes. Mileage is expected to be almost 75 miles on a full charge.

The Leaf has had a year of production driving, so consumers will have real road statistics from which to buy into electric.

What green car are you most intrigued by?

Algae Powered Apartments

These apartments in Germany are 100% self powered by algae fueled bio reactors. Algae panels on the building also provide shade and temperature regulation, as the sunnier it is the thicker the algae grows in the panels.

Algae Powered Apartment

Read more: http://homes.yahoo.com/news/net-zero-apartments-powered-live-algae-151500406.html

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Learn how to make algae biofuel: http://organicmechanic.com/algae-biofuel/ or to make an algae based business to take advantage of these and other algae business trends! http://organicmechanic.com/algae-business/

Apple Facilities Running on Renewable Energy

Apple’s Data Centers Now Running on 100% Renewable Energy, Corporate Facilities at 75%

Source: http://www.macrumors.com/2013/03/21/apples-data-centers-now-running-on-100-renewable-energy-corporate-facilities-at-75/

Take A Bite With The PB&J Campaign

Is it possible to protect animals and the environment through a vegan based diet? The people from the PB&J Campaign believe it is a fact. The organization was formed by a group of concerned citizens sponsored by the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs (SEE) who assists activist working to improve the world naturally. The PB&J Campaign’s sole purpose is to fight our environmental issues through limiting the amount of animal products people eat. Their goal is to shed light on the damage eating animals cause and help individuals change one meal at a time. Although, the program’s reasons are geared more towards environmentalism than animal rights it promotes vegan lifestyle and in the process will save thousands of defenseless animals from slaughter houses. The program shows individuals that they can make a huge difference similar to the act of recycling through simply changing their diet as well.

How Does It Actually Work?

According to the PB&J Campaign, everything we eat comes from plants, whether we eat the plants directly or through an animal intermediary. The basic problem is that animals are inefficient at converting plants into meat, milk, and eggs. Relatively little of what they eat ends up in what you eat because animals use most of their food to keep them alive – to fuel their muscles so they can stand up and walk around, to keep their hearts beating, to keep their brains working. That cow, pig, or chicken has to eat a lot more protein, carbohydrates, and other nutrients than it yields in meat, eggs, or milk. The result is that it takes several pounds of corn and soy to produce one pound of beef, or one pound of eggs, one pound of milk, etc. This holds true even if we’re measuring calories or protein; it takes several times the calories or protein in livestock feed to produce the calories or protein we get from the meat, eggs, or milk.

If we’re wasting livestock feed, we’re also wasting what it takes to grow that feed. This includes inputs like fossil fuels (with all the emissions they produce) to run machinery, to pump water for irrigation, for transportation, and to produce the pesticides and fertilizers. Then there’s the land (= cleared rainforest and grasslands) for growing the crops, along with fertilizers (which produce their own greenhouse gas emissions) and pesticides. When you eliminate livestock and digest plants directly it takes less plants to support you. You also save the inputs that go into the plants. You save fossil fuels, water, land, fertilizers, and pesticides. You also save extra greenhouse gas emissions from fertilizer and burning fossil fuels, and you save water pollution from chemicals and silt washing off fields into waterways.

And if that’s not enough, you save on the resources used in raising the animals – yet more land and water. You also save the animal waste that is its own pollution problem, not to mention more greenhouse gas emissions like methane from enteric fermentation. Few people are aware that livestock is responsible for 18% of global climate change.

If you want to contribute in the fight to make a healthier planet by one meal at a time than take the Pledge Now.

Smart Energy Technology: www.OrganicMechanic.com